Latest News - 30/05/19
First public view of the 2009 Lagonda Concept

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First public view of the 2009 Lagonda Concept

Not seen in public since it’s truncated 2009 launch, the controversial Lagonda Concept was eventually displayed at the 2019 AMOC Spring Concours

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Model Year (MY)

Model Year (MY)

In general, the model year for Aston Martin changes following the factory summer shutdown in August of each year. It is a time that updates are often made to the general specification of a car. Sometimes updates are applied mid year which throws up partial model years such as 2016.5MY and 2012.25MY. It’s a handy way to categorize the improvements made to the cars. The 10th character in the VIN is for the model year.   

Diamond Turned

Diamond Turned

Diamond turning is a multi-stage process often used in the finishing of alloy wheels. Initial stages of machining are carried out using a series of CNC lathes of increasing accuracy. A diamond-tipped lathe tool is used in the final stages of the manufacturing process

Aniline leather

Aniline leather

Aniline leather is the most natural looking leather with the unique surface characteristics of the hide remaining visible. Aniline leather is coloured only with dye and not with a surface coating of polymer and pigment . A light surface coating may be applied to enhance its appearance and offer slight protection against spillages and soiling. The first Aston Martin to use Aniline leather as standard was the DB7 Zagato.

Semi-aniline leather

This is a type of leather that sits between the most common Pigmented Leather  (the most durable and used in the majority cars) and Aniline leather which is the most natural looking leather with the unique surface characteristics of the hide remaining visible. Semi-aniline leather is more durable than aniline whilst still retaining a natural appearance. The increased durability is provided by the application of a light surface coating which contains a small amount of pigment. This ensures consistent colour and imparts some stain resistance. The first Aston Martin cars that used semi-aniline leather was the DB9 Stratsone coupe from 2010.

Superleggera

Superleggera

Superleggera, with is Italian for “super light” is a method for car coachwork construction developed by Felice Bianchi Anderloni of Italian coachbuilder Carrozzeria Touring. Patented by Carrozzeria Touring in 1936, the method consists of a structural framework of small-diameter steel tubes that form the body’s shape which are covered by thin alloy body panels that strengthen the framework. This method of construction was used in the DB4, DB5, RapideRapide and to a lesser extent, the DB6.

The superlegggera construction clearly visible in the roof of this stripped down DB5

The superlegggera construction clearly visible in the roof of this stripped down DB5

Alcantara

Alcantara

Alcantara is a man-made fabric composed of about 68% polyester and 32% polyurethane with appearance and tactile feel similar to that of suede. It is used as a dash covering, and seat fabric although it is moat commonly used as a headlining material.

Light Blade

Light Blade

These are rear lamps first seen on the DP-100 Digital Concept Car and put into production on the Vulcan. Despite its unique design this lamp still comprises a brake light and Directional Indicator.

Salmons

Salmons

Salmons were a coachbuilding firm that was based in Newport Pagnell, that became Tickford Motor Bodies. They built the bodies for the DB 2/4 Mark II and Mark III after David Brown bought the company Tickford in 1954. Subsequently, AML moved to the Tickford Works, Newport Pagnell during the late 1950’s.

Curlicue

Curlicue

Derived directly from AMR race cars, Curlicue is a gill-like vent incorporated into each front wheel arch lining, reducing unwanted front-end aerodynamic lift. Neatly concealed beneath the DB11 clamshell bonnet, its design vents high-pressure air from the top of the front wheel arches though recessed apertures behind the iconic Aston Mar tin side strakes. Further high pressure air is extracted from the back of each wheel arch through discreet stirrup vents positioned af t of the front wheels.

 

Aeroblade

Aeroblade

The Aston Mar tin Aeroblade™ harnesses air flow along DB11’s flanks to enhance stability at the rear. Intakes positioned in the base of the C-pillars draw air flow within the bodywork before venting it from slots in the rear bootlid. Acting like a conventional spoiler, this jet of disrupted air reduces aerodynamic lift, cleverly obviating the need for an upswept ‘flip’ in the tail.

 

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